The family and friends of the journalist, Zardasht Osman, 23, said he was killed because of his scathing articles about the region’s two governing parties and its leaders, including the dominant Barzani family. Mr. Osman was a university student who freelanced for a number of publications and often wrote on the Internet under a pseudonym.
“I am in love with Barzani’s daughter,” read a satirical and irreverent Web post by Mr. Osman in December, which appeared to violate a taboo in the region’s deeply conservative and clan-based culture by referring to a female family member of the region’s president, Massoud Barzani. Mr. Osman mused about how he could rise from his poor surroundings by marrying one of Mr. Barzani’s daughters.
Some Kurdish journalists and Mr. Osman’s friends accused members of the security forces, which are controlled by the parties, of direct involvement in the crime.
The killing of a journalist has been rare in the Kurdish region, at least in recent years. The authorities have worked hard to ensure a haven for business and oil and gas investments, where thousands of foreigners, including American citizens, live and work freely.
But security forces are often accused of intimidating, threatening and assaulting journalists affiliated with opposition parties or critical of the corrupt patronage system fostered by the two governing parties.
“This work is beyond the capability of one person or one small group,” read a statement issued on Thursday and signed by 75 Kurdish journalists, editors and intellectuals.
“We believe the Kurdistan regional government and its security forces are responsible first and foremost and they are supposed to do everything in order to find this evil hand.”
There was no reaction from the local government. But an official with Erbil’s police department, who requested anonymity because he was not authorized to speak with the news media, condemned the killing and said the results of an investigation would be announced shortly.
According to relatives and friends, Mr. Osman was abducted by men in a white minibus immediately after he was dropped off Tuesday morning by his brother Sardar opposite the main entrance of the liberal arts college of the University of Salahaddin. He was to have graduated from the university in June with a degree in English.
Sardar Osman, who said he did not see the kidnapping, said that his brother got out in front of the Fine Arts Institute, where at least half a dozen soldiers from the well-trained Zerevani unit of the Kurdish pesh merga armed force guard the gate at all times.
A member of this force on duty that day, Khawer Hassan, said the street was “too crowded” for him to witness anything.
Mr. Hassan said students told him that Mr. Osman had been kidnapped. He said he informed the institute’s dean, who came out and picked up Mr. Osman’s books and notebooks, which were strewn on the street.
Sardar Osman said the family received a call on Wednesday informing them that Mr. Osman’s body had been dumped in front of the offices of the Patriotic Union of Kurdistan, one of the two governing parties, in the eastern section of the city of Mosul, about 50 miles west of Erbil.
He was among the family members who went to Mosul on Thursday to bring back Mr. Osman’s body.
“Who can do this except the security and government forces?” asked a tearful Hawjin Sabah, 22, as she and friends of Mr. Osman’s took part in an emotional funeral procession on campus.
Two of Mr. Osman’s friends held up a banner asking: “Who’s responsible?”
Friends and relatives asked how Mr. Osman could have been kidnapped from the heart of a tightly secured city and taken out of Erbil past numerous checkpoints, including one maintained by American soldiers.
Another brother, Beshdar Osman, said that his brother received a threatening phone call in January, telling him to leave Erbil. “The reason was his writing,” he said.
Renas Salam, a friend, said Mr. Osman received another threat in April from a caller saying that he had “one week to leave Erbil or he would be killed.”
Mr. Osman had been writing for almost two years under the pseudonym Saro Zardasht for the Sweden-based Kurdistanpost, known for its satirical articles critical of the two governing parties and its leaders. Mr. Osman’s last article was about the “failure” of Kosrat Rasoul, a senior leader in the Patriotic Union of Kurdistan — the party of Iraq’s president, Jalal Talabani — which has been losing ground over the past year to a splinter reform movement known as Gorran.
He also started working five months ago for an Erbil-based magazine called Samal Post and contributed several articles to Hawlati, an independent newspaper based in the region’s other main city, Sulaimaniya.
The last killing of an Iraqi Kurdish journalist was in 2008 in the Kurdish-controlled section of the city of Kirkuk, south of Erbil. Many journalists blamed security forces of the two governing parties for that killing.
Since then Kurdish journalists have continued to be harassed, threatened and physically assaulted by security forces. There were 357 such violations last year, according to the Kurdistan Syndicate of Journalists. 
Kidnapping and assassination to condemner (Sardasht Osman)
Public
The combined total of more staff to honor Kurdistan says: will be free and the corset is of great ideas.  But at the heart of the capital of Irbil, Kurdistan and eyes forward visibility and police forces secure the city along with journalists and university students (Sardasht Osman) is kidnapped a few days after his body is found in Mosul.
We do this to non-fair and we condemn their President Kurdistan responsible to know that the secret to discover otherwise in this kidnapping was conducted at the border of his party responsible for his assassination because we know now to intimidate journalists and beating unarmed his party at the border is done he has no reaction.
While we’re condemned to do this sorrow and regret to the family and we have announced late on your site about this campaign announced and we want you to vote at this time to write
* Transcript for  –  President of Kurdistan –  Chief Ministers of Kurdistan –  President of Kurdistan Parliament  – – All the country’s consul in Kurdistan – Kurdistan Borderless Journalists Group-
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Abducted Kurdish Writer Is Found Dead in Iraq
 
Ayman Oghanna for The New York Times
Members of Zardasht Osman’s family knelt before his coffin in Erbil, Iraq, on Thursday.
By SAM DAGHER
Published: May 6, 2010
ERBIL, Iraq — A Kurdish journalist was kidnapped here in the capital of the semiautonomous Kurdistan region of Iraq, tortured and then found dead with two bullets in the head on a highway, his family and members of the security forces said on Thursday.
The family and friends of the journalist, Zardasht Osman, 23, said he was killed because of his scathing articles about the region’s two governing parties and its leaders, including the dominant Barzani family. Mr. Osman was a university student who freelanced for a number of publications and often wrote on the Internet under a pseudonym.
“I am in love with Barzani’s daughter,” read a satirical and irreverent Web post by Mr. Osman in December, which appeared to violate a taboo in the region’s deeply conservative and clan-based culture by referring to a female family member of the region’s president, Massoud Barzani. Mr. Osman mused about how he could rise from his poor surroundings by marrying one of Mr. Barzani’s daughters.
Some Kurdish journalists and Mr. Osman’s friends accused members of the security forces, which are controlled by the parties, of direct involvement in the crime.
The killing of a journalist has been rare in the Kurdish region, at least in recent years. The authorities have worked hard to ensure a haven for business and oil and gas investments, where thousands of foreigners, including American citizens, live and work freely.
But security forces are often accused of intimidating, threatening and assaulting journalists affiliated with opposition parties or critical of the corrupt patronage system fostered by the two governing parties.
“This work is beyond the capability of one person or one small group,” read a statement issued on Thursday and signed by 75 Kurdish journalists, editors and intellectuals.
“We believe the Kurdistan regional government and its security forces are responsible first and foremost and they are supposed to do everything in order to find this evil hand.”
There was no reaction from the local government. But an official with Erbil’s police department, who requested anonymity because he was not authorized to speak with the news media, condemned the killing and said the results of an investigation would be announced shortly.
According to relatives and friends, Mr. Osman was abducted by men in a white minibus immediately after he was dropped off Tuesday morning by his brother Sardar opposite the main entrance of the liberal arts college of the University of Salahaddin. He was to have graduated from the university in June with a degree in English.
Sardar Osman, who said he did not see the kidnapping, said that his brother got out in front of the Fine Arts Institute, where at least half a dozen soldiers from the well-trained Zerevani unit of the Kurdish pesh merga armed force guard the gate at all times.
A member of this force on duty that day, Khawer Hassan, said the street was “too crowded” for him to witness anything.
Mr. Hassan said students told him that Mr. Osman had been kidnapped. He said he informed the institute’s dean, who came out and picked up Mr. Osman’s books and notebooks, which were strewn on the street.
Sardar Osman said the family received a call on Wednesday informing them that Mr. Osman’s body had been dumped in front of the offices of the Patriotic Union of Kurdistan, one of the two governing parties, in the eastern section of the city of Mosul, about 50 miles west of Erbil.
He was among the family members who went to Mosul on Thursday to bring back Mr. Osman’s body.
“Who can do this except the security and government forces?” asked a tearful Hawjin Sabah, 22, as she and friends of Mr. Osman’s took part in an emotional funeral procession on campus.
Two of Mr. Osman’s friends held up a banner asking: “Who’s responsible?”
Friends and relatives asked how Mr. Osman could have been kidnapped from the heart of a tightly secured city and taken out of Erbil past numerous checkpoints, including one maintained by American soldiers.
Another brother, Beshdar Osman, said that his brother received a threatening phone call in January, telling him to leave Erbil. “The reason was his writing,” he said.
Renas Salam, a friend, said Mr. Osman received another threat in April from a caller saying that he had “one week to leave Erbil or he would be killed.”
Mr. Osman had been writing for almost two years under the pseudonym Saro Zardasht for the Sweden-based Kurdistanpost, known for its satirical articles critical of the two governing parties and its leaders. Mr. Osman’s last article was about the “failure” of Kosrat Rasoul, a senior leader in the Patriotic Union of Kurdistan — the party of Iraq’s president, Jalal Talabani — which has been losing ground over the past year to a splinter reform movement known as Gorran.
He also started working five months ago for an Erbil-based magazine called Samal Post and contributed several articles to Hawlati, an independent newspaper based in the region’s other main city, Sulaimaniya.
The last killing of an Iraqi Kurdish journalist was in 2008 in the Kurdish-controlled section of the city of Kirkuk, south of Erbil. Many journalists blamed security forces of the two governing parties for that killing.
Since then Kurdish journalists have continued to be harassed, threatened and physically assaulted by security forces. There were 357 such violations last year, according to the Kurdistan Syndicate of Journalists.
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The item written by “ Sardasht Osman” in 2009-12-13. That may have caused
His brutal assassination on May  4th. 
 
 
I am in love with the daughter of Barzani
I am in love with the daughter of Masud Barzani; the man who appears in public every now and then and says I am your president .But I love very much he become my father-in-law, that is to say I want to become Néchirwan’s brother-in-law. If I marry the daughter of Barzani, I and my wife spend our honeymoon in Paris and we will visit our uncle’s White House in America for a few days. I will move from needy quarters of Hewlér to Sari Rash and on the
nights American watchdogs and Israeli security guards protect my home.
My ill-fated father who was a Peshmarga during  the era of September Revolution and KDP does not account his services while he was Peshmarga anymore, on the pretext that he is not a member of KDP now, I will appoint as the minister of Peshmarga, and make my unfortunate brother the chief of my special body guards unit, although he has qualified from university now is unemployed and wants to flee to abroad clandistanly. And my sister who still is timid to go to Bazar alone , must as Barzani girls drive prado and Wanawsha cars.
And my mom who sufferes from diabetes, heart decease and blood pressure and has no means to be operated abroad, I will appoint two Italian physicians to care for her at home.
I will arrange several house for my uncles and give my cousins military ranks as colonels, leutinats and commander of army divisions.
But my friends say “ let it be Saro, do not cause your killing. This is Mulla’s house, as soon as
they say go away, this is the end of your fate”. But I am not uttering blasphemy, I swear to the handle of Mulla Mustefa’s dagger, Edris Barzani spent three nights in a mountain while my father was in his company,what is wrong with that, if Masud Barzai considers himself as
the president, during the past 18 years how many times he has visited a neighborhood in Hewlér or Silémani?
But my problem is that this man is so deeply attached to tribal values, that he does not give a dam to any one outside Sari Rash. I can find the images of the wives of all leaders of the world  by just a little click on Internet, but I still do not know how my mother-in-law looks like?
I do not whom I should send to go and  pop the question? In the beginning I thought to arrange a group of mullas, whitebeards and veteran Peshmargas to go by the name of God in an evening and pop the question , but a journalist friend  of mine told me “ good boy  find some Jashes and anfalchis, Masud likes them very much”, another friend said; “ if you take my advice go to a press conference of Néchirwan Barzani, go near to him and say may you be blessed I have a request. If that did not work, ask Dashné, she meets them very often; this way it could be arranged for you.

 Links:
http://www.kurdistannet.info/net/index.php/gshti/8523-2009-12-28-09-27-38.html
network times:
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/05/07/world/middleeast/07erbil.html
one article of Mr. Osman
http://www.google.co.uk/search?q=%D8%B3%D9%87%E2%80%8C%D8%B1%DB%86+%D8%B2%D9%87%E2%80%8C%D8%B1%D8%AF%D9%87%E2%80%8C%D8%B4%D8%AA&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a

 

 

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